ropecast — 21.11.17, 12:00:00

116. Of excellence, elite and eminences

Roger and Neil continue their discussion of the "Teaching Excellence Framework" that has been established in England and Wales to judge the quality of teaching in higher education.

Neil illustrates how increasing competition between education institutions can turn out rather problematic, and Roger adds how he thinks it unlikely that something similar could be established in Germany.


Download MP3, 6,5 MB

ropecast — 06.11.17, 12:00:00

115. Measuring university

Roger is talking to his brother Neil, who's back for another episode.

This time they look into ways of measuring the quality of university teaching, the approach taken in the UK and potential problems affecting the "measuring process".

Can the results of such an inquiry really be unbiased?

The TEF project
Read up here on the TEF, the "Teaching Excellence Framework" currently being established in the UK


Download MP3, 6 MB

ropecast — 20.10.17, 12:00:00

114. Of proverbs' value

After last episode's discussion about cultural values in fixed expressions, our two hosts return to a topic they've already delved into a long while ago: Proverbs.

Peter mentions a new cool proverb that he's come across but Roger reminds him, that proverbs in general are really not that frequent in language. But Peter doesn't give up on his favourite easily ...

Episode 19
The first episode dealing with proverbs that Roger references


Download MP3, 4,5 MB

ropecast — 04.10.17, 12:00:00

113. Of cultural values in expressions

Did you ever wonder where the Rolling Stones got their name from?

Peter did and asked Roger about it. Roger suspects it's derived from an English language expression, which he explains to Peter.

That explanation leads to a discussion about how much of a culture's value system is reflected in its language, expressions and proverbs.


Download MP3, 6,4 MB

ropecast — 16.09.17, 12:00:00

112. Things that don't exist at school

Last time we dealt with culturally specific concepts that do not easily translate, because they are missing their counterparts in other languages.

This time our two hosts find a bunch of peculiar things in the American school system, that don't exist in Germany and - to some extent - are also foreign to Brits.


Download MP3, 8,3 MB

    Next Page »